Man Dies in Calgary Hospital After Buried 10-Feet-Deep by Avalanche Near Golden, BC

AvyBrains | | AvalancheAvalanche
Image of the avalanche that killed a man in Hospital Creek near Golden BC. Image from February 9th, 2018 by Golden & District Search & Rescue

A 36-year-old male was caught and injured in an avalanche near Golden, BC on February 9th, 2018 after being buried 3-meters-deep (10′) by the avalanche depicted above.

The Golden-Field Royal Mounted Canadian Police (RMCP) has reported that that man died of his injuries in a Calgary hospital on February 16th, 2018.  

Thus far, it isn’t clear if this man was skiing, snowboarding, or snowmobiling.  Our best guess is that he was skiing or snowboarding at the time of the avalanche.

This was the 4th avalanche death in Canada this winter.

8 people have died in avalanches in the USA this winter.

On Friday, February 9th GADSAR was tasked to respond to an avalanche in Hospital Creek.

One man was buried 3 meters deep.

Thanks to well trained bystanders he was extricated in a timely manner. Once SAR volunteers arrived on scene they helped to continue with first aid, package the patient and transport him to the airport where BCAS was waiting.

From the Golden Hospital the patient was transported to Calgary via STARS air ambulance.”

– Golden & District Search & Rescue on February 9th, 2018

Map showing location of Hospital Creek zone near Golden, BC. map: snowpeakrentals.com

The Golden-Field Royal Mounted Canadian Police (RMCP) has reported that that man died of his injuries in a Calgary hospital on February 16th, 2018.  

This man was buried 3 meters (10′) deep by an avalanche on February 9th, 2018.

“The Golden-Field RCMP can confirm that the 36 year-old male involved in the avalanche on February 9 near Golden has died in Calgary hospital.

Police will continue to assist the BC Coroner’s Service with their investigation as needed. ”

– BCRMCP on February 16th, 2018

Avalanche Canada had issued an avalanche warning for the Golden BC area from February 9th-12th, 2018 that explained the complexities of the current snowpack including lots of new snow, storm slabs, and 4 persistent weak layers.

“The name of the game this weekend is conservative route selection, low angle terrain,and being very mindful of overhead hazard.” – Parks Canada visitor safety specialist Lisa Paulson on February 8th, 2018

 

“People might be surprised by how large an avalanche can be triggered and how far it could run.” – Mark Bender, forecaster for Avalanche Canada on February 8th, 2018

***

Special Public Avalanche Warning for Interior BC Ranges

Special Public Avalanche Warning in effect immediately until the end of the day Monday, February 12

Avalanche Canada is issuing a Special Public Avalanche Warning for recreational backcountry users, in effect immediately until the end of the day Monday, February 12. The warning applies to the following regions: Lizard Range & Flathead, South Rockies, Purcells, Kootenay Boundary, South & North Columbia, Cariboos, and North Rockies. For a map of the regions involved, click here.

The snowpack in these areas contains a complex mix of weak layers. The weight of the new snow from nearly three weeks of constant storms has triggered many large avalanches in recent days. The pattern of avalanche activity is expected to change beginning Friday when the current storm breaks and a shift from widespread naturally triggered avalanches to more sporadic activity is expected.

“The decrease in natural avalanches coupled with improved weather and the long weekend is a classic situation where skiers and snowmobilers venture into more aggressive terrain where they might trigger avalanches themselves or be struck from above,” says Mark Bender, a senior avalanche forecaster for Avalanche Canada. “People might be surprised by how large an avalanche can be triggered and how far it could run.”

Numerous surprises and near misses have occurred in the last couple of weeks and a fatal accident occurred between Blue River and Valemount on January 30. “While danger ratings might come down on the weekend, lingering hazard will exist on most aspects and elevations for several days after the storm breaks,” adds Bender. “Travelling safely in the backcountry for the next few days will require expert-level skills to avoid hazardous areas. If you don’t have the training to recognize and avoid avalanche terrain, please avoid the backcountry or hire a professional guide.”

Parks Canada and Kananaskis Country have also released special public avalanche warnings for the weekend. Click here to learn more.

For current avalanche conditions, visit www.avalanche.ca.

 


Related Articles

5 thoughts on “Man Dies in Calgary Hospital After Buried 10-Feet-Deep by Avalanche Near Golden, BC

  1. In the photo is the red arrow’s tail pointing toward another crown? scary because that little clearing could be anywhere with deep snow. in the west

    1. Gosh, I hadn’t noticed that. Looks like it is another crown. Yes, this treed terrain would be easy to feel safe in.

Got an opinion? Let us know...