San Francisco’s Dolores Hill Bomb Could Be Done For Good

Spencer Cox | CrashCrash
Hill bomb
The Dolores Hill Bomb. Photo Credit: SF Gate

The skating community has lost another classic skate spot to anti-skating infrastructure. Just this week, the San Francisco city government implemented speed bumps on Dolores Hill- the location of the famous (or infamous, depending on who you ask) Dolores Hill Bomb.

Every July, skaters from around the Bay area gather for a full day of rowdy hill bombs. The skating is wicked fast, the speed wobbles are terrifying, and the crashes are gnarly.

speed bumps
Speed bumps covering a section of the hill. Photo credit: Hoodline

The implementation of the speed bumps comes as a result of numerous life-threatening crashes that have occurred over the past few years. Last year, a skater suffered severe brain trauma from a nasty crash. In 2017, tensions rose with the San Francisco police department after a skater and police car collided. This year, a skater and cyclist crashed into one another sending both individuals to the hospital. The cyclist tragically died two days later.

SFMTA
SFMTA workers adding speed bumps, while a skater looks on. Photo Credit: Jeffery Tumlin

In response to the speed bumps and push back from the SF skate community, SFMTA director (San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency), Jeffery Tumlin stated that he regretted the necessity to add speed bumps and spoke highly of San Francisco’s legendary skate culture. 

In a Twitter post, Tumlin wrote:

SF’s streets are for mobility and joy for everyone. SF skaters, we need help elevating bystanders’ lives over your own risk. We have many hills. Work with us”.


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2 thoughts on “San Francisco’s Dolores Hill Bomb Could Be Done For Good

  1. Good luck stopping skateboarders. All it will take is a propane torch and a scraper bar and those dots are gone. SF has hundreds of spots to Hill Bomb, move to a different location. It will continue, Skateboarders don’t give two FKS about your speed dots.

  2. The cyclist in the collision died two days ago (on Sunday, July 19). That information could have been included in the article.

    Per SF news, the “speed bumps” (actually rows of Botts’ Dots) were installed a day before the cyclist died and an SF official did mention that the cyclist had not died after erroneously reporting his death. It looks like this article was based on information from the weekend.

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