Why Oh Why Does Japan Get SO Much Snow?

Sponsored | | BrainsBrains

[this article is sponsored by evo.com]

Tateyama Kurobe Alpine Route, Japan. Today.
Tateyama Kurobe Alpine Route, Japan. Today.

Japan gets insane amounts of snow.  Rumors of 1,200″ per year in spots may be exaggerated (although they may not be…), but snowfall averages of somewhere around 600″ per year in Niseko, Hokkaido seem right on (they’ve reportedly recorded up to 1,500″ of snow in one year).  Last year we saw 600″ of snow in town in Hakuba in only 10 weeks.  We can only image how much fell up high…

If you haven’t been to Japan yet, it’s time to go. 

evo.com is taking skiers and riders to Japan this January and February.  evo’s got all the details worked out for you so all you have to do is show up, ski deep pow, eat great food, gape at monkeys in hot springs, rip sick terrain, and get blown away by amazing culture.

Japan gets the most snow in January and February and it’s simply non-stop…

How Japan's sea-effect snow works. How Japan’s sea-effect snow works. THIS is why Japan gets so much snow. image: ski.com.au How Japan’s sea-effect snow works. THIS is why Japan gets so much snow. image: ski.com.au
How Japan’s sea-effect snow works. How Japan’s sea-effect snow works. THIS is why Japan gets so much snow. image: ski.com.au
How Japan’s sea-effect snow works. THIS is why Japan gets so much snow. image: ski.com.au

All this snow begs the question: 

Why Does It Snow So Much in Japan?

Japan happens to be situated in just the right place geographically to take advantage of a freezing cold, magical wind coming off Earth’s longest east-west contintent:  Asia.

This bitterly cold wind blows across the length of Asia, picks up moisture off the Sea of Japan, then dumps that moisture as snow when it hits the mountainous isles of Japan.  Japan has mountains up to 10,000-feet high right on the coast which force that moisture-laden air to quickly rise & drop its moisture as snow.  This snowfall is like lake-effect snow, but it’s sea-effect snow.  It’s magic.  You don’t need storms in Japan.  You just need this wind to blow and voila! it snows.

“The mountains of Japan are so snowy because they are susceptible to a cold Siberian wind that slams into the mountains of Japan, forces the air to rise, and that wrings out tremendous amounts of snowfall.  It’s like our lake effect snow in the US, but on a much bigger scale.” – Nick Wiltgen, Weather Channel meteorologist

Cold Siberian wind blows off Asia, picks up moisture on Sea of Japan, slams into Japan’s mountains, and boom, you have big snow. image: weather channel
Cold Siberian wind blows off Asia, picks up moisture on Sea of Japan, slams into Japan’s mountains, and boom, you have big snow. image: weather channel

If you’re interested in skiing or snowboarding Japan this season, evo is ready to take you.  Evo’s got all the details worked out for you so all you have to do is show up, ski deep pow, poke monkeys in hot spring with sticks, eat great food, and get blown away by amazing culture.

These evo Japan trips are hot, they’re sexy, and they will sell out.  One already has…

  • Trip 1: January 24 – January 31, 2016, Hakuba, Japan
  • Trip 2: January 31 – February 7, 2016, Hakuba, Japan
  • Trip 3: January 31 – February 7, 2016, Myoko, Japan
  • Trip 4: February 7 – February 14, 2016, Myoko, Japan – SOLD OUT

More information here:  Evo Japan Trips 2016

Miles Clark in deep on Honshu isle. photo: zach paley
Miles Clark in deep on Honshu isle. photo: zach paley

***

related post:

The Top 6 Reasons To Go To Japan This Winter

When Is The Best Time to Ski & Ride Japan?

Where is the SNOWIEST Place on Earth?

 


Related Articles

One thought on “Why Oh Why Does Japan Get SO Much Snow?

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.